JJ Anselmi
Author Archive

JJ Anselmi

J.J. Anselmi is the author of Heavy: A Memoir of Wyoming, BMX, Drugs, and Heavy Fucking Music (Rare Bird), and he loves to beat the shit out of the drums. You can find more of his writing at jjanselmi.com

DoomFeaturedMusicReviews

Phemüt’s debut LP, The Memory Of Spring, is a vacuum of hopelessness. To listen to the album in its entirety is to have any optimism you might have for your own life and/or the future of our species slowly but relentlessly winnowed into nothing. “The Symbology Of Ruin” wastes no

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Black MetalDeath MetalDoomFeaturedReviews

Nightfell’s latest, Darkness Evermore, is an aural tapestry of isolation and nihilism. From the opening of the album to its close, the band displays a refreshingly wide range of attack. Consisting of Tim Call of Aldebaran on drums and vocals, and Todd Burdette of Tragedy and His Hero Is Gone

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DoomFeaturedPsychReviews

There are certain things that will never go out of style in the realm of stoner metal — good riffs, guitar and bass tones that find the perfect balance between presence and attack, and fat-as-fuck drumming — and Spelljammer is keenly aware of this. Ancient Of Days, the Swedish trio’s

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Apocalyptic BluesHardcoreMusicReviewsStreaming

Cursed Graves’ debut LP, California Noise, is damn near perfect. Hailing from San Diego, the trio has only been around for a few years. But, listening to California Noise, you’d never guess. The album wastes no time, beginning with the nihilistic beach punk of “Opus Dei.” Guitarist Blake Cox plays

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Avant GardeDocumentariesFeaturedFilmMusic

The latest installment of Ivan Weiss and Sam Stephenson’s Big, Bent Ears: A Serial in Documentary Uncertainty covers Nazoranai, an improvisational group consisting of Oren Ambarchi, Stephen O’Malley, and the legendary noise artist Keiji Haino. The fifty-minute documentary combines interviews with each member of Nazoranai with pieces of their amazing

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FeaturesLive Rituals

With The Road Home, which consists of Jay Munly and Noah Landis, Scott Kelly expands that calm into a chasm of meditation and despair, which is perfectly captured on 2012’s The Forgiven Ghost In Me (recorded by Noah Landis and released on Neurot Recordings). Watching the group live is akin to staring into Camus’ existential abyss: the abyss stares right back into you.

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